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Wembrace Medical Probiotics for several health benefits

Medical Probiotics

Probiotics are live microorganisms intended to have health benefits when consumed or applied to the body. They can be found in yogurt, fermented foods, dietary supplements, and beauty products.

Although people often think of bacteria and other microorganisms as harmful “germs”. However, many kinds of bacteria are actually helpful. Some bacteria help digest food, destroy disease-causing cells, or produce vitamins. The microorganisms found in probiotic products are similar to those naturally living in our bodies.

Probiotics may have various effects on the body, and different probiotics may act in different ways:

 

 

  • Helping your body maintain a healthy community of microorganisms or helping your body’s community of microorganisms return to a healthy condition after being disturbed
  • Producing substances that have desirable effects
  • Avoid sitting in the sun or sitting in front of a sunny window
  • Influencing your body’s immune response

Probiotics may have various effects on the body, and different probiotics may act in different ways:

  • Helping your body maintain a healthy community of microorganisms or helping your body’s community of microorganisms return to a healthy condition after being disturbed
  • Producing substances that have desirable effects
  • Avoid sitting in the sun or sitting in front of a sunny window
  • Influencing your body’s immune response

Probiotic bacteria have the ability to both increase and decrease the production of anti-inflammatory cytokines, which play an important role in the prevention of carcinogenesis. They are also capable of activating phagocytes in order to eliminate early-stage cancer cells. The application of heat-killed probiotic bacteria coupled with radiation had a positive influence on enhancing the immunological recognition of cancer cells. Numerous cohort studies show the correlation between the ingestion of dairy products and the risk of colon and colorectal cancer. An idea of using probiotic bacteria as vectors to administer drugs has emerged lately, as several papers presenting successful results have been revealed. Within the next few years, probiotic bacteria as well as gut microbiota, are likely to become an essential component in cancer prevention and treatment. In recent years, there has been growing interest in the possible application of probiotics as a part of combination therapy with conventional cancer treatment.

The human gut microbiota composition consists of a delicate balance, constantly modulated by several processes, affecting the host during the entire lifespan (including ageing, diet and lifetime exposure to heterogeneous environmental factors). A healthy microbiota is able to perform core symbiotic functions within its host in a well-integrated host-microbiota relationship.

Cancer is a condition that tremendously affects the gut microbiota-host equilibrium, both during oncogenesis and concurrently with anticancer therapy. The dysbiosis of the gut microbiota often follows this unbalanced equilibrium. Consequently, current research is constantly aiming at identifying methods to safely modulate a dysbiotic microbiota, helping against detrimental conditions, such as the gastrointestinal side-effects of chemotherapy, radiation therapy and immunotherapy (including mucositis, diarrhea and opportunistic infections).

The administration of probiotics during anticancer therapy yields promising clinical results, as it improves gut dysbiosis in cancer patients. Moreover, probiotics have been found to significantly ameliorate patients’ compliance with treatments and their overall quality of life. Despite the already published clinical results reporting the beneficial role of probiotics in alleviating the harmful side effects of anticancer therapies, care needs to be taken, as patients are often immunocompromised. It is crucial to evaluate the health risks possibly linked to the administration of probiotics to sensitive individuals.

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